About

Dr. Anna Forbes earned her Bachelor of Medical Sciences degree and Medical degree from Nottingham University’s Medical School in 2004 and 2006 respectively.

“Having worked in the NHS and private sector for many years I became increasingly disappointed with the way we managed our patients. A ‘sticking plaster approach’ was how I came to see it, and I became interested in exploring the real root causes of people’s health issues. This led me to the field of Integrative Medicine. Integrative Medicine (IM) considers the whole person and the interconnection that exists between the various parts that make up a person. Through this lens, we can more easily see where things have gone wrong and led to the current state of health, and thus how to begin reversing the process. I began to first research this in greater depth by studying mental and emotional wellbeing in a variety of psychotherapeutic approaches to include Medical Hypnosis. I had a private practice in psychotherapy for a number of years, and received my postgraduate diploma in the Study of Integrative Medicine in 2011. Since then I have studied Nutritional Medicine, Functional Medicine, the use of Quantum devices in clinical practice, Heart Rate Variability, Kinesiology approaches, the energy-rebalancing approach of the Vitali-Chi system, Mindfulness, Yoga, Medical (Zhineng) Qigong, and Meditation, Intravenous Nutritional Therapy and Plasmolifting.

Why I became an Integrative Medical Doctor

I had planned to become a doctor from the age of 13. I was particularly interested in the workings of the human mind and had my heart set on psychiatry. During my fourth year of Medical School we began our clinical attachments, and I was given my first professional glimpse into the world of Psychiatry. It shocked me! The consultant Psychiatrist I was under, clearly had problems with stress, mood, and social skills. The treatment approach for the inpatients seemed so backward to me. The patients still appeared so unwell, despite their treatment. Overall it did not look to be a successful, or rewarding, branch of medicine at all. The experience had put me off the idea of Psychiatry altogether.

My next wake-up call was during my first surgical attachment at Addenbrookes hospital in Cambridge. I was working long hours on the hepato-biliary unit as a junior doctor. We were continually under intense time pressure. 14-16-hour days, and food breaks were a rare luxury due to time constraints. I remember that even time to drink water was limited. It was ‘the surgical ethos’ I was told, you just got on with it. Both my registrar and my fellow junior developed heart arrhythmias during my time there. It was tough. The silver lining was that it was a top specialist unit, so we received excellent clinical experience. I remember the moment that it dawned on me that there was a pattern to what I was seeing. I was starting to notice that patients with different mindsets and attitudes towards their illness and their recovery had different outcomes. Despite coming into the unit with the exact same diagnosis and stage of disease, I began to see that those with more of a ‘fighting spirit’ and positive outlook, would have shorter stays, recover more quickly, and have fewer complications from surgery and infection, compared to those with a more fearful, anxious, or negative outlook. I found this fascinating. I began to ask my seniors about it and they were totally disinterested and dismissive of any association. I now understand that it was because these less mechanical factors are a part of being human that doctors cannot control, or even ‘do’ much about at all!

It was following this that I began to explore what else could be done beyond the confines of the modern medical approach to help people improve their health and mental status. I began to read about Positive Psychology and other self-help strategies. I became interested in the role of the subconscious in the development of disease and trained in Medical Hypnosis, cognitive therapy, kinesiology, and Psychoanalysis, practising as a psychotherapist alongside my medical work.

In 2009 I met the director of the Orassy centre, Konstantin Pavlidis. With a wealth of experience and at the top of his field in a multitude of natural health therapies, he is also a scientist and has developed approaches to explain natural healing phenomena through Quantum Physics. I was introduced to a range of cutting edge quantum and medical devices that can reflect an individual’s causative factors relating to their current health status, the likes of which I had never seen before.

In 2011 I completed the UK’s first university training programme in Integrative Medicine, which opened me up to many other natural and scientific therapeutic approaches. I did my elective as part of this in Beijing, and interviewed patients that had practised Medical Qigong after conventional medicine had failed them. All of them had had curative results, it was incredible. I was fortunate enough to have the Chinese research translated for me when I was out there as it wasn’t in English at that time. It was observational data only, but the results were impressively unlike anything I had seen from other medical research.

In 2018 I was fortunate enough to embark on one of the best UK training programmes for Intravenous Nutrient Therapy by internationally acclaimed Dr. Jacques Otto. I was, and have been since, stunned by the wide range of applications and incredible results that are achieved through this advanced neutriceutical therapy. Soon after I was again extremely fortunate to be offered training abroad in the German technology of ‘Plasmolifting’, with myself and Orassy being the first to offer it in the UK. Once again, the results I have seen have been truly astounding, and as it utilises the body’s own plasma, it is the most natural and perfect therapy for it.